The Joy of Cooking Standard Edition: The All-Purpose Cookbook (Plume) Info

Check out our selection of the best cooking, food, and wine books of the month and the best books and ebooks of the year so far. Do you want to download The Joy of Cooking Standard Edition: The All-Purpose Cookbook (Plume)? Still asking yourself if The Joy of Cooking Standard Edition: The All-Purpose Cookbook (Plume) by Irma S. Rombauer,Marion Rombauer Becker is the best book to download? We are here to help you - Check out over #reviewcount# reviews. Read&Download The Joy of Cooking Standard Edition: The All-Purpose Cookbook (Plume) by Irma S. Rombauer,Marion Rombauer Becker Online Author:Irma S. Rombauer,Marion Rombauer Becker Formats:Mass Market Paperback,Spiral-bound,Hardcover,Plastic Comb,Paperback Publication Date:Jan 1, 1995 Ratings: 4.47 of 134667


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Reviews for The Joy of Cooking Standard Edition: The All-Purpose Cookbook (Plume):

5

Dec 21, 2007

The day I found out my grandmother was dying was the day I got this book.

She was sick and we were both very hopeful that she would get better. She was lying on the couch in the living room and asked me to boil her a potato. I, being 19, had NO idea how to boil a potato! But I did not want to bother her about it - so I went into the kitchen and started up the pot of water.

Not only did I ruin that cute little potato ... but I saw my grandmother lose it!! She came into the kitchen and saw the whole The day I found out my grandmother was dying was the day I got this book.

She was sick and we were both very hopeful that she would get better. She was lying on the couch in the living room and asked me to boil her a potato. I, being 19, had NO idea how to boil a potato! But I did not want to bother her about it - so I went into the kitchen and started up the pot of water.

Not only did I ruin that cute little potato ... but I saw my grandmother lose it!! She came into the kitchen and saw the whole potato (not peeled or cut) hanging out in the pot and lost it. She started crying... How can I leave you if you can't even boil a potato?!

My grandfather happened to arrive home at that moment. He did a big sigh when he heard and saw the commotion. My poor frail grandma rolling around on the stool (too weak to stand up even), throwing pans around as she was trying to find another pot to make her potato in. He got her calmed down and fixed her another potato. But before it was even boiled she made him go out to the store "right this minute" and buy me the joy of cooking.

She knew that she would not always be in the kitchen with me to help me cook -- so she got me a GREAT back up.

That is how I knew my grandmother wasn't going to get better and that I had better learn how to boil a potato.

I love you grandmother! ...more
5

Mar 04, 2008

The 1997 edition is infallible.

The pre-1997 editions are good if you want to can or pickle your own veg, cook opossum, and make aspic.

The fifth edition, ie the 75th Anniversary edition shown in the picture above, contains too much retro-inspired nonsense and does not continue the practical and innovative approach laid out in the 1997 edition.

Basically, the 1997 edition took the heart of the Joy of Cooking, that is, that it is a book that contains all the recipes your average american cook The 1997 edition is infallible.

The pre-1997 editions are good if you want to can or pickle your own veg, cook opossum, and make aspic.

The fifth edition, ie the 75th Anniversary edition shown in the picture above, contains too much retro-inspired nonsense and does not continue the practical and innovative approach laid out in the 1997 edition.

Basically, the 1997 edition took the heart of the Joy of Cooking, that is, that it is a book that contains all the recipes your average american cook needs, and updated it for the 1997 american palate (added in asian and mexican foods, , removed casseroles made with mushroom soup, etc). The first person narrative of the other editions was mostly removed.

The 75th anniversary editions does no further innovation, and instead adds in some of the older recipes and sections (with limited practical use, in my opion), and adds a good bit of personal narrative back in.

If you're serious about cooking, find the 1997 edition, it will never let you down. If you're interested in the evolution of american recipes from the perspective of the Becker family, the 75th anniversary edition is your book.

...more
4

Oct 14, 2007

I would not consider this my "everyday" cookbook but the The Joy of Cooking is a definite must for anyone that takes their cooking seriously, enjoys spending a bit of time in the kitchen, and needs a good all-purpose reference that covers everything from emergency substitutions to complete banquet spreads.

What do I like most about The Joy of Cooking? It is fairly encyclopedic, covering about as broad a range of cooking topics as it can; while most of the recipes are from the Western tradition, I would not consider this my "everyday" cookbook but the The Joy of Cooking is a definite must for anyone that takes their cooking seriously, enjoys spending a bit of time in the kitchen, and needs a good all-purpose reference that covers everything from emergency substitutions to complete banquet spreads.

What do I like most about The Joy of Cooking? It is fairly encyclopedic, covering about as broad a range of cooking topics as it can; while most of the recipes are from the Western tradition, it also dips into some less traditional preparations (e.g., ceviche). The book does not assume that you know anything about cooking -- not sure what a "dash" is? You can look up an explanation for that. What's the difference between a filet and a cutlet? It explains that, too. (HINT: they're basically synonymous.) It has a great index, is organized well, and has recipes to cover almost any occasion and varying degrees of culinary sophistication.

What don't I like about The Joy of Cooking? It's encyclopedic nature can be a little intimidating sometimes. If you already have a good idea of what you want to make, there's a good chance that you'll find a great recipe; if you're looking for ideas though, the text may overwhelm you. Speaking of text -- the pictures are all illustrations. Granted, they're good illustrations but I tend to prefer photos in my cookbooks (helps me decide what to try next).

One last point about The Joy of Cooking: I would recommend it to everyone except vegetarians. The book assumes an omnivore's diet so if you eschew the animals in your diet, I would estimate that greater than half of these recipes would not appeal to you. ...more
4

Aug 29, 2007

In their attempt to modernize the book, the authors omitted many recipes and techniques that are still relevant. Where is Sole Florentine, for heavens sake? And while not many families routinely can or freeze food as a winter survival strategy, there are still times when I would like to know how to do it - when my CSA gives me more corn than we can manage, or when local strawberries are beautiful, fresh, plentiful, and cheap. The lack of ice cream recipes is frustrating, especially given that so In their attempt to modernize the book, the authors omitted many recipes and techniques that are still relevant. Where is Sole Florentine, for heavens sake? And while not many families routinely can or freeze food as a winter survival strategy, there are still times when I would like to know how to do it - when my CSA gives me more corn than we can manage, or when local strawberries are beautiful, fresh, plentiful, and cheap. The lack of ice cream recipes is frustrating, especially given that so many manufacturers are making good quality electric powered ice cream makers.

On the other hand, there are lots of new recipes that reflect the increasing influx of immigrant culture (and food!) into America.

I'd say, Definitely buy this book, but don't chuck your old editions of Joy just yet. You're going to need both! ...more
5

August 10, 2015

A Cook's Holy Bible
This is a "home cooks" bible. The Joy of Cooking is a fine cookbook offering "how to instructions" on just about anything! I learned to carve a turkey when I was 12 by following the instructions in this book!! I am a big fan and have given this same cookbook to friends and family throughout my adult life. I could not create without this bible. Thank you Ms. Rombauer for giving us the best cookbook ever!
5

Dec 26, 2010

For Christmas, I decided I was going to have Japanese strawberry shortcake (as in a sponge cake filled with strawberries and cream). I needed a basic sponge cake recipe and couldn't find one anywhere, not even in my usual high-altitude baking bible, Pie in the Sky, nor in the other book I had, The Best Recipe. It was December 24th, the only other recipe I'd found was online from New Mexico but which I did not trust (it asked me to beat the eggs until stiff, a HUGE no-no at high altitude). Almost For Christmas, I decided I was going to have Japanese strawberry shortcake (as in a sponge cake filled with strawberries and cream). I needed a basic sponge cake recipe and couldn't find one anywhere, not even in my usual high-altitude baking bible, Pie in the Sky, nor in the other book I had, The Best Recipe. It was December 24th, the only other recipe I'd found was online from New Mexico but which I did not trust (it asked me to beat the eggs until stiff, a HUGE no-no at high altitude). Almost at the end of my rope, it suddenly occurred to me to try this book.

And I found it: High-altitude Sponge Cake, on page 750!

I now have a beautiful Japanese strawberry shortcake in the fridge chilling until dinner. Christmas Eve is saved, thanks to Joy of Cooking! ...more
5

Jan 23, 2011

I don't know why it took so long for me to include this very worthy book to my Goodreads Library. This is my second copy. The first, a paperback, became so tattered and worn that my son presented this valued edition as a gift. I have been cooking for more than forty years, but continue to return to this book for ideas, information and special recipes. On many occasions I search for new ways to prepare foods and will find the ideal formula for preparation. Frequently I will "tweak" the recipe in I don't know why it took so long for me to include this very worthy book to my Goodreads Library. This is my second copy. The first, a paperback, became so tattered and worn that my son presented this valued edition as a gift. I have been cooking for more than forty years, but continue to return to this book for ideas, information and special recipes. On many occasions I search for new ways to prepare foods and will find the ideal formula for preparation. Frequently I will "tweak" the recipe in order to please the palates of my diners, but JOY has rarely failed to please me.

It is important to note here that this is far more than a recipe book. It is possible to sit down and read this hefty tome for information and sheer enjoyment. Aside from the wealth of sections for appetizers, through to a huge array of desserts, there are sections describing a multitude of food facts. One can learn about different grains, exotic fruits and vegetables and the preparation and significance of many ethnic foods. Historical and geograpical factors are also included.

I would recommend this above all other cookbooks for both novice and experienced food preparers! A perfect engagement gift! ...more
5

January 26, 2014

Only cookbook I use
There are a lot of editions of this cookbook -- and I know because I own from the 30's and one from the 2000's too. But this one is the only one I use. Full of actual information about HOW to cook, what ingredients go well together, and what to do with every kind of food. And other neat stuff, from party menus to how to do a clambake. It may be from the 70's, but it never gets old.
5

Aug 10, 2007

i love this old 1973 edition rescued from my mom's basement. the writing style is awesome: you can hear them chiding you for your awkward kitchen skills. heavily uses ingredients that are out of fashion now, so that's historically interesting: lots of parsley, livers, anchovies, tarragon.

the recipes are not all so daunting: some of them are forward-looking to today's minimal cooking in their simplicity and flexibility. saved me many times when my fridge was sadly understocked.

also, you can cook i love this old 1973 edition rescued from my mom's basement. the writing style is awesome: you can hear them chiding you for your awkward kitchen skills. heavily uses ingredients that are out of fashion now, so that's historically interesting: lots of parsley, livers, anchovies, tarragon.

the recipes are not all so daunting: some of them are forward-looking to today's minimal cooking in their simplicity and flexibility. saved me many times when my fridge was sadly understocked.

also, you can cook ANYTHING with this. including bear. whale. 'possum. (although for the latter, it suggest you raise it on a diet of milk and grains for a week before boiling it. this book is not for the weak!) i actually enjoy reading this book for fun during breakfast. ...more
5

Jun 25, 2018

I enjoyed flipping through this, and I made a pretty good dinner ALL BY MYSELF. (what an achievement right?) The Joy of Cooking just has so much depth to it, with hundreds of recipes, add ons, possible amendments, and very interesting segments on cuts of meat, best way to use grains, and well thought-out menus. it's the OG of cookbooks for a reason, and in my eyes the best cookbook of all time.
5

July 4, 2014

A must own cookbook.
I got this book in order to have the recipe for Portuguese Green Soup. I heard it was in this book. But then, when I made the soup I didn't like it so much. As it turns out, I'm not a big fan of kale unless it's cook as soft as cooked spinach and I thought this soup was too salty for my taste. HOWEVER, I LoVe this cookbook anyway. It is loaded with so many useful recipes that I will not be able to live without. Especially recipes on how to make cakes/cupcakes from scratch.
5

January 20, 2016

Not just for nostalgia
Since great old recipes, nostalgic recipes (beaver and possum) and fancy ones (creme brule). It had been around since not long after the turn of the century (1900s) so there's soooooooo much you can learn.
5

November 29, 2014

A small encyclopedia of techniques for the advanced and for the beginner.
I actually dislike quite a number of the recipes because of what I see as heavy handed spicing, BUT and most important, if one wants to learn the basics such as cuts of meat , length of roasting, what the separate ingredients actually DO in a recipe, etc. this is the beast you want. It gives the methods for many of the classic sauces, and while many of the recipes may be a little pedestrian, on a day when imagination is lacking and you are staring dumbly at what's in the refrigerator, you can reset the old cooking brain by going through the book based on what ingredients you have. iAnd the Ladies humor has me roaring at times: definitely a mood enhancer.
My copy, I bought in 1977; and it is pretty dilapidated, and I will leave to one of my sons who has a nose and an attitude like his father. I just bought this copy for my son in law who is taking his first steps; he bombards me with questions- may be that will shut him up.
I recommend this edition (1975): all the subsequent ones are inferior in one way or another.
5

Jun 21, 2007

Started as a project for my church back in the 1930s here in St. Louis, The Joy of Cooking is now an American classic. It is encyclopedic in scope. If you just want to know how to boil an egg...it's in there. If a friend brings you rudabaga...there's a recipe for that, eel....there's a recipe for that, wild game...there's a recipe for that, triple layer chocolate cake...it's in there too. Want to know which wine glass to use...where to place the forks...or how to do practically anything in the Started as a project for my church back in the 1930s here in St. Louis, The Joy of Cooking is now an American classic. It is encyclopedic in scope. If you just want to know how to boil an egg...it's in there. If a friend brings you rudabaga...there's a recipe for that, eel....there's a recipe for that, wild game...there's a recipe for that, triple layer chocolate cake...it's in there too. Want to know which wine glass to use...where to place the forks...or how to do practically anything in the kitchen...it's in there! I have a very soft spot for this book and anytime I find one at a yard sale, thrift store, book fair...I buy it!

The 75th edition has too much baking soda in the pancakes so use previous editions for that recipe. A friend of mine read the tuna salad recipe wrong - instead of using mayo OR olive oil, he read mayo AND olive oil - and it is super delicious the wrong way too. The brownie recipe is the best anywhere and even I can make them.

If you only own one cookbook, this is the one to own. ...more
5

Jun 17, 2007

Goodness gracious, this book could be called "The Kitchen Bible". It has contains information on anything and everything you could ever want to know about preparing food. I don't understand how anyone can possibly know this much (I think writing this book would be more difficult than writing a dictionary) but I'm sure glad that they do!
5

Aug 13, 2016

Been hip to this book and have used it here and there ( I don't really cook all that much), but last night I made a mac and cheese for a large family dinner, and that shit was flame so I decided to shout them out.
1

May 14, 2009

I got this way back when I first got married. I wasn't a good cook then and I'm not now! This cookbook didn't help!
5

Sep 28, 2010

This big, amazing book covers about everything one needs to know. Procedures, instructions, recipes, techniques, guides, food charts. This needs to be in every cooks library. Timeless information
5

October 9, 2015

The very best Joy
Love, love, love it. I have a newer version, but especially the older, 'Know your ingredients' sections are so helpful and interesting. A must on a cook's cookbook shelf.
4

September 5, 2007

Excellent cooking reference
Excellent basic reference to cooking a very wide variety of foods for a very wide variety of purposes. Few books fulfill the job better.
3

Dec 24, 2015

I'll start with the written content: this cookbook is a complete guide not just for cooking, but for food as a whole. There are recipes for every conceivable type of consumable. Beverages (nonalcoholic and alcoholic), appetizers, snacks, candies, jellies, desserts, sauces/toppings, stuffings, and what goes in-between: simple entrees to full-blown multi-course dinners. The instructions are detailed and easy to understand. Unlike cookbooks that tell you to "cut into fillets and braise until done" I'll start with the written content: this cookbook is a complete guide not just for cooking, but for food as a whole. There are recipes for every conceivable type of consumable. Beverages (nonalcoholic and alcoholic), appetizers, snacks, candies, jellies, desserts, sauces/toppings, stuffings, and what goes in-between: simple entrees to full-blown multi-course dinners. The instructions are detailed and easy to understand. Unlike cookbooks that tell you to "cut into fillets and braise until done" or "serve with a piquant sauce," the directions take you through step-by-step, always explaining what is really meant. The ingredients range from items found in any supermarket to the more obscure near-alien things that will require serious searching, although most of the ingredients are quite reasonable. There are numerous illustrations throughout, finally letting mankind in on the secret of why some coffee cakes look like they were made from the inside out.
Not just recipes, either. This book includes detailed information on selecting, testing for/maintaining freshness, storing (including an entire chapter on freezing), preparing, and cutting the food. Different types of fruit are explained. Half a dozen pages are devoted to informing the reader about wine. Cuts of beef are explained here; it finally explains why chuck is chuck and tip is tip, and where they come from. Table decor, place settings, and appropriate wine glasses are explained too.
The writing style is joyful. Clearly, the authors do not just enjoy cooking, serving, and eating the food... they like talking about it, too. There is a gleeful sense of humor throughout, and anecdotes about where the food originated from and how it got its preposterous name. The contents of this cookbook are a treasure.
Now for the bad part: the physical book. Had the pages been printed on better quality paper, I would upgrade this poor excuse for a tome to galley status. The paper is clearly manga paper, almost (but not quite) as good as the quality of the phone book paper of your yellow pages, yet not quite as thick. The pages are transparent enough that you do not need to turn the flimsy page to see what is printed on the other side. The text size is small, the same size as the print of the listings in a phone book. The ink quality is atrocious; it's obvious that the photocopying machine used to crank out these pages was running out of toner, giving the book dark-text pages and fuzzy pale-text pages. Sometimes it's hard to tell whether the text is in bold print or if the toner cartridge went into its final death throe. The spiral spine is cheap plastic and does not allow easy page-turning. The quality of this (physical) book is absolutely ridiculous. ...more
5

Jan 04, 2010

My parents bought me my first copy of Joy in 1998. Somewhere along the line I broke its back so I recently purchased a new copy. I expect that tells you how much I value this cookbook. It is far from the only cookbook in our home, but it gets used more than any other. I have seen other editions and while they have their following, I prefer this one. From Chicken Fried Steak to Crispy Roast Duck to something called 'vegetables', 1997 Joy has what you need.
5

Apr 01, 2017

This book is an absolute classic and for good reason. If I want to experiment with a new ingredient that's on sale at the grocery store, I can almost always find a recipe in my lovely handmedown copy of Joy of Cooking. I've been told that the 6th edition is the "definitive" one, but I'm quite fond of my 5th edition and don't feel the need to buy another.
5

Jan 31, 2016

I develop lots of recipes, and when I need to know what's considered standard ingredients for a specific dish, I always turn to this book. It's a great reference source. If you never owned another cookbook, you could get along fine with just this one.
2

Nov 29, 2007

My mother used this, among many other cookbooks. I've never used it much. But it's very useful as a reference to determine the correct cooking times for different methods of cooking many different vegetables.

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