Curious George: 75th Anniversary Edition Info

Book and Ebook Reviews of the Best Kids' Books - Read over #reviewscount# reviews for Curious George: 75th Anniversary Edition by H. A. Rey,Margret Rey and see what others have to say about this book before you download. Read&Download Curious George: 75th Anniversary Edition by H. A. Rey,Margret Rey Online Author:H. A. Rey,Margret Rey Formats:Hardcover Publication Date:Sep 6, 2016


This treasured classic is where it all began for
the curious, loveable monkey. Special anniversary cover with foil
and spot gloss make this edition a must-have for any
children’s book collection. Includes bonus downloadable
audio read by the actor, producer, and director John
Krasinski. Access code can be found inside the book on page
2.

Average Ratings and Reviews
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Reviews for Curious George: 75th Anniversary Edition:

4

Sep 05, 2016

Book Review
4 of 5 stars to Curious George by H.A. Rey, a children's author, who wrote this series starting in 1941. Who didn't love Curious George when they were a child? Or even now as an adult? So many fun memories of this wonderful little monkey. In this first book, George comes home for the first time, and the infamous yellow coat becomes a hallmark. He's so innocent, yet such a magnet for bad things to happen. But aren't all monkeys? An adorable way to teach kids to ask questions, but Book Review
4 of 5 stars to Curious George by H.A. Rey, a children's author, who wrote this series starting in 1941. Who didn't love Curious George when they were a child? Or even now as an adult? So many fun memories of this wonderful little monkey. In this first book, George comes home for the first time, and the infamous yellow coat becomes a hallmark. He's so innocent, yet such a magnet for bad things to happen. But aren't all monkeys? An adorable way to teach kids to ask questions, but only up to a point, and sometimes... not knowing is better than knowing. I love reading these books to my younger cousins, seeing their eyes light up at all the adventures. And when I taught in a daycare one summer, it was our morning read every day... what was the minky doing? They couldn't say "monkey" easily. Such fun memories...

FYI - Wrote this review ~2017 from memory as I want to have a review for everything I remember reading. If I messed it up, let me know! LOL :)

About Me
For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. ...more
5

June 1, 2017

Five Stars
A+
5

Mar 05, 2014

* Read and reviewed by me and my niece Emma *

What is it about this monkey that so enthralls readers? This introductory story by Rey is not terribly memorable or particularly exciting, yet the kids are drawn to it, I absolutely love it and my niece - a first time reader/listener - was mesmerized.

For those who forget what happens in this first Curious George book, a poacher the Man With The Big Yellow Hat captures George in the wild, illegally keeps him in his city apartment, smokes a pipe with * Read and reviewed by me and my niece Emma *

What is it about this monkey that so enthralls readers? This introductory story by Rey is not terribly memorable or particularly exciting, yet the kids are drawn to it, I absolutely love it and my niece - a first time reader/listener - was mesmerized.

For those who forget what happens in this first Curious George book, a poacher the Man With The Big Yellow Hat captures George in the wild, illegally keeps him in his city apartment, smokes a pipe with him, neglects to give him proper care so that George goes bad and ends up in prison, and then gets transported to the zoo, a slightly less dreary internment.

As you see, it's a mean streets existence for our little simian friend.



He's taken from one jungle and forced into another. The society he inhabits changes, but his habits within society do not. George, you see, is curious. Some would call it his one great failing. He likes to check things out and that gets him into trouble. If it weren't for his curiosity he never would've been captured in the first place. And that right there is why we become entranced by Curious George.

But why the fascination in the first place? Why did my niece see the cover of this book and decide "this one!"? My guess is that, well, who doesn't love a monkey? In the past, when Emma has done something silly and flopped about all crazy like kids do, I would occasionally call her a monkey. So I think she just was curious to see what her brethren were up to. These days she also has a strong interest in chickenbutt and getting people people to answer "what" to her question "Guess what?!". Rest assured, I am doing yoeman's work in the uncle department. But I digress...

Other than that she liked it, Emma didn't have much to say about Curious George when we finished, yet she was riveted the whole way through. Heck, I didn't even do funny voices and her eyes were still glued to the pages. I have no doubt she'll want to return to the adventures of Curious George in the future and I will be happy to! George is my dawg! He was my favorite stuffed animal as a child. I carried him all the way up a mountain in a tiny backpack as boy no older than 4-year-old Emma, because I couldn't bare to leave him behind. George and I were inseparable and I wouldn't be surprised if he found a new bestie in my niece.



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0

Oct 12, 2018

Yikes this... has not aged well. I'm glad there are happier sequels and that the movie and TV shows gave it some much needed updates. There's some glimmer of heart in this first one but also a lot of bad bad things.
4

Jan 05, 2019

Where it all began with a curious monkey! A man travels to Africa to find a monkey for the big city zoo. He finds one, trapping George, and begins the journey back. From the early stages, it's curiosity that almost killed the monkey when he went overboard on a ship back to 'home'. Once in the big city, George discovers that sometimes being curious can be a little too much, especially when the fire department gets a call. A great beginning to a beloved series that Neo has come to love. Neo did Where it all began with a curious monkey! A man travels to Africa to find a monkey for the big city zoo. He finds one, trapping George, and begins the journey back. From the early stages, it's curiosity that almost killed the monkey when he went overboard on a ship back to 'home'. Once in the big city, George discovers that sometimes being curious can be a little too much, especially when the fire department gets a call. A great beginning to a beloved series that Neo has come to love. Neo did quite enjoy this book, but wondered how the Man with the Yellow Hat knew George's name right off the bat. It would seem that he wanted to know how the 'George' name came up, but that was not discussed. Either way, he was interested in the story and the illustrations, nothing like the computer generated ones from books nowadays. A great start to a sensational series! ...more
5

Mar 13, 2017

Another book placed on the shelf of childhood. How many times did I do things like Curious George that turned out to be (in hindsight) not the best possible choice? When I was a preteen all the boys in my neighborhood did some pretty DUMB things (the girls had more common sense) like 'sword fights' with tree branches, rock throwing fights, throwing kitchen knives at the fence, sling shots...how lucky we all were that no one got hurt (badly). Just like George we all had to learn that most Another book placed on the shelf of childhood. How many times did I do things like Curious George that turned out to be (in hindsight) not the best possible choice? When I was a preteen all the boys in my neighborhood did some pretty DUMB things (the girls had more common sense) like 'sword fights' with tree branches, rock throwing fights, throwing kitchen knives at the fence, sling shots...how lucky we all were that no one got hurt (badly). Just like George we all had to learn that most important of lessons - curiosity can make a monkey out of you - especially if mom catches you! ...more
3

Feb 11, 2012

Here's a book I hadn't thought about for several decades, recently brought to my attention by Jack, a three-year-old friend who met me at his door, book in hand, wanting to be read to. "Ah! Curious George," I said, immediately remembering and wanting very much to be reminded of the times it had been read to me in early childhood.

As it happens, the book is dreadful by any adult, twenty-first century standards. The story is horrific for what it accepts: a jungle monkey is tricked by a white man, Here's a book I hadn't thought about for several decades, recently brought to my attention by Jack, a three-year-old friend who met me at his door, book in hand, wanting to be read to. "Ah! Curious George," I said, immediately remembering and wanting very much to be reminded of the times it had been read to me in early childhood.

As it happens, the book is dreadful by any adult, twenty-first century standards. The story is horrific for what it accepts: a jungle monkey is tricked by a white man, kidnapped and taken across the sea, destined for a zoo. By misadventure he escapes into the foreign city, has dangerous adventures, then is "rescued" to spend the rest of his days in happy captivity. --Just about as politically incorrect as one can imagine and, besides, the art is poor...

Still, Jack, working by his own standards, liked the story, identifying presumably with the curious monkey, with the trouble such curiousity can lead to and with the resolution of all the excitement in the confines of a safe home.

--All of which makes me wonder if many studies have been done of the books children prefer as opposed to the books parents prefer to give to their children... ...more
4

Jun 29, 2017

This is a book I loved as a child that I hadn't read in a long time! It's an iconic character, and brings up some valuable topics for children. There were a number of books in the series, but the first one was on point, and still a favorite to have (parents and teachers) today.
4

Aug 10, 2013

My 5 yr old is really loving Curious George books right now. And for all the Curious George books out there, they actually have pretty good story lines. What I mean is, sometimes when a character has been commercialized, the books change in tone. I'm guessing these were written before the T.V. show. I did a little reading on Rey and it turns out they came up with Curious George many years ago, while escaping Nazi's in Paris. After their death, Curious George was taken over by the Curious George My 5 yr old is really loving Curious George books right now. And for all the Curious George books out there, they actually have pretty good story lines. What I mean is, sometimes when a character has been commercialized, the books change in tone. I'm guessing these were written before the T.V. show. I did a little reading on Rey and it turns out they came up with Curious George many years ago, while escaping Nazi's in Paris. After their death, Curious George was taken over by the Curious George Foundation, so that's what I mean by character integrity. Sometimes when taken over by someone else, especially after they get so commercialized with T.V. and products, they change. From all of these I've seen so far, these are still pretty good.

I've been making my son read on his own more and more, to give me some time to have lessons with the twins, and it's been working wonderfully. I don't care so much as what the book is about than the reading level. And this one is probably a good level 2 book. He enjoyed it a lot, and was able to answer all my questions, so I know he read the whole thing. ...more
3

Feb 14, 2017

Listen, George: first things first, I love your work. I've listened to all of your books. Your antics are delightful, you're cute as a button, and I aspire to get up to as much mischief as you do someday. But can we talk about your "friend"--the Man in the Yellow Hat? Lest we forget, all of your adventures, delightful as they may be, started when the Man KIDNAPPED YOU FROM YOUR HOME AND TOOK YOU AWAY FROM EVERYONE AND EVERYTHING YOU HAD EVER KNOWN. I just find it strange that you guys are buds Listen, George: first things first, I love your work. I've listened to all of your books. Your antics are delightful, you're cute as a button, and I aspire to get up to as much mischief as you do someday. But can we talk about your "friend"--the Man in the Yellow Hat? Lest we forget, all of your adventures, delightful as they may be, started when the Man KIDNAPPED YOU FROM YOUR HOME AND TOOK YOU AWAY FROM EVERYONE AND EVERYTHING YOU HAD EVER KNOWN. I just find it strange that you guys are buds now. I mean, has he ever apologized? You two seem to have kind of a weird relationship. If you need help, give me some kind of signal. My parents are lawyers, they'll make a call or something.

Anyway, five stars for you, one star for the Man in the Yellow Hat, we'll settle on 3. XOXO, -M ...more
1

January 4, 2017

Not recommended from this seller
Nothing as expected
Arrived Damaged
What a disapointment
4

Jun 02, 2009

According to old family tales, I requested that my parents read this one to me so many times that they resorted to accidentally on-purpose "misplacing" it for a while--just long enough to get a chance to read something else to me. :D That said, as an adult, I struggle with rating this classic. As a kid, I loved all the craziness George gets into and how the man in the yellow hat loves him regardless. Now, I find myself cringing at so many things-George being stuffed into a bag and taken from his According to old family tales, I requested that my parents read this one to me so many times that they resorted to accidentally on-purpose "misplacing" it for a while--just long enough to get a chance to read something else to me. :D That said, as an adult, I struggle with rating this classic. As a kid, I loved all the craziness George gets into and how the man in the yellow hat loves him regardless. Now, I find myself cringing at so many things-George being stuffed into a bag and taken from his home, George smoking a pipe, George being put "in prison" for "fooling" the firemen. That said, I'm finding that many of my students (so far, the K-2 ones) love this story. There are usually giggles when George thinks he can fly, gasps when George goes to prison, and big grins when George shares his balloons with the other animals at the zoo. So, what I now do is this.

I introduce the concept of copyright date as a book's birthday and where to find it (verso), and how to tell how old a book is. Then, to put it into perspective, I tell them the story of my parents hiding the book, and we talk about what it was like 70+ years ago. Did people dress the same? Did cars look the same? Telephones? The kids seem to be fascinated with the idea of a dial-phone (need to find one and bring it in). As we read, we spend some time discussing some of the things in the pictures that might not be familiar to the kids now. Other things that we end up discussing? Why the words say they row out to the big ship when the row boat looks bigger than the ship (they love pointing out that it only LOOKS small "cuz it's far away"). Good chance to introduce a new vocabulary word--perspective--and appeal to my visual learners. Then we talk about whether this story is "made up" or "informational" to lead in to reading a non-fiction story. I've been paring this with "Chimpanzees" or "Jane Goodall." Gotta say, I'm having fun all over again with this story. :D
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1

Mar 02, 2012

I will never understand why this book and its progeny have been so well loved for over seventy years. (H.A. and Margaret Rey apparently escaped Nazi-occupied France on homemade bicycles with the manuscript for Curious George.)

The Man with the Yellow Hat travels to Africa, entices George with his hat, catches him, "pop[s] him into a bag," and ultimately takes him to live in a zoo. Despite capturing him from the wild to take him to a zoo, the Man with the Yellow Hat is referred to as George's I will never understand why this book and its progeny have been so well loved for over seventy years. (H.A. and Margaret Rey apparently escaped Nazi-occupied France on homemade bicycles with the manuscript for Curious George.)

The Man with the Yellow Hat travels to Africa, entices George with his hat, catches him, "pop[s] him into a bag," and ultimately takes him to live in a zoo. Despite capturing him from the wild to take him to a zoo, the Man with the Yellow Hat is referred to as George's "friend."

Before arriving at the zoo, George smokes a pipe and does a stint in prison. After George inadvertently calls the fire department, the firefighters catch him and say, "You fooled the fire department...We will have to shut you up where you can't do any more harm." Then they take him away to prison.

While I am horrified by this book, I am also bored by it, as I am by all of the Curious George books that I have read. I just don't find George or the Man with the Yellow Hat to be very compelling characters. ...more
2

Jul 19, 2015

George, who is happily living "in Africa," is captured by a man in his eponymous yellow hat to take him to a zoo. This is all in the first few pages and is a strange basis for their famous friendship--is friendship what Stockholm syndrome creates?--in the subsequent books. George also smokes, is imprisoned for playing with the phone, and ends the book smiling in the zoo. What were parents like that this became a popular children's book?
5

Nov 25, 2007

Totally awesome book. There's like a monkey and stuff. And there's like a dude with a yellow hat. The book's like yellow too. I reminds me of cheese. Sweet, sweet cheese.The monkey is like curious and stuff. His name's like George. He's so awesome.
3

Aug 30, 2019

I'm fairly confident I read all of these multiple times when I was little. I'm actually considering reading the New York Public Library's top 100 list of kids' books and pleasantly surprised that I've already read a lot of them.
3

May 29, 2013

Reading and the love of books can't encouraged too soon. The Curious George books by H.A. and Margaret Rey were great favourites of our kids and Jeanne has delighted in them ever since Elin brought a jumbo book containing six tales back from a trip to New York last fall. She went looking for our old copies shortly thereafter so ever since Jeanne's been read the old ones--now in tatters--when she visits here.

The stories are still charming, but one of the things that goes over Jeanne's head is the Reading and the love of books can't encouraged too soon. The Curious George books by H.A. and Margaret Rey were great favourites of our kids and Jeanne has delighted in them ever since Elin brought a jumbo book containing six tales back from a trip to New York last fall. She went looking for our old copies shortly thereafter so ever since Jeanne's been read the old ones--now in tatters--when she visits here.

The stories are still charming, but one of the things that goes over Jeanne's head is the way that the city George lives in changes between books. In the first one it's quite clearly Paris, and the zoo where he goes to live is the Ménagerie in the Jardin des plantes, but the next one is just as clearly New York.

The reason why came clear this morning when the quality French language daily here Le Devoir had an article about an exhibit on George's creators. The Reys were German Jews who met in Brazil where each had gone separately as young people. Rey (born Hans Augusto Reyersbach) and the former Margarete Elisabeth Waldstein founded the first advertising agency in Rio in the 1930s, but decided to go back to Europe, setting up shop in Paris. The curious little monkey appears to have been just one of their projects.

In 1939 the French publisher Gallimard was ready to bring out the first book about the monkey, then called Fifi, but the Reys' studio was searched by the French police on a tip that there might be material for making bombs there. The sketches of George convinced the flics that wasn't the case, but the Reys took the hint the following spring. They decamped for Portugal, taking with them only their Brazilian passports, their sketches and what was left of their advance from Gallimard. At the Spanish border their German accents raised eyebrows with Franco's Fascists, but the innocuous drawings of George and their Brazilian nationality allowed them to continue. Their journeyed back to Brazil and then on to New York, where they started over again.

George once again came to their rescue. Within a month they had a contract with Houghton Mifflin and the first Curious George book was published in 1941. Since then 17 million copies of the various Curious George stories (the Reyes produced seven, and a series has been spun off, written and drawn by others which are not nearly as good.)

The Reyes adventures are highlighted in a exhibit at the Montreal Holocaust Museum from now until June 22. The show was created by Omaha, Nebraska, Institue for Holocaust Education, and is touring North America. Definitely worth the detour if it comes your way. ...more
3

Jun 30, 2018


I loved Curious George as a kid. I cannot remember the exact date I read it since it was a long time ago. But I recently picked up an Anniversary edition from my local Target. I did re-read it for old times sake. I enjoy the story but was and am still not a fan of the cute little monkey smoking a pipe. I understand that during the time frame that this book was published, during that generation, it was part of that era and was to be expected. But I didn't and still don't like that part of the
I loved Curious George as a kid. I cannot remember the exact date I read it since it was a long time ago. But I recently picked up an Anniversary edition from my local Target. I did re-read it for old times sake. I enjoy the story but was and am still not a fan of the cute little monkey smoking a pipe. I understand that during the time frame that this book was published, during that generation, it was part of that era and was to be expected. But I didn't and still don't like that part of the book. But all in all it is cute and it is a classic that I would recommend. ...more
2

Jan 23, 2013

This is the classic story of George the monkey, heartlessly ripped from his jungle home and kidnapped to a foreign land, where he's forced to figure out his way when the Man in the Yellow Hat leaves him by himself. After wreaking havoc on the city for an entire day, George is arrested and sent to prison (the zoo).
4

May 08, 2018

This book was longer than I remembered, which I liked for my 4-year-olds' increased attention spans - longer than many other picture books but shorter than a chapter book. Fun details in the illustrations and while still fairly simple, introduces some richer vocabulary words.
2

Feb 06, 2018

I hate Curious George so much, I can't even tell you. Admittedly, I am not the target audience and the target audience seems to like it just fine. I was trying to figure out the appeal -- maybe the fun of watching someone else get in trouble? or maybe it has the kind of physical comedy that appeals to four year olds (falling into things, getting messy, etc.)? I was hoping to avoid the gazillion George books, but -- curse you, preschool! -- he saw a video at school and came home super keen on I hate Curious George so much, I can't even tell you. Admittedly, I am not the target audience and the target audience seems to like it just fine. I was trying to figure out the appeal -- maybe the fun of watching someone else get in trouble? or maybe it has the kind of physical comedy that appeals to four year olds (falling into things, getting messy, etc.)? I was hoping to avoid the gazillion George books, but -- curse you, preschool! -- he saw a video at school and came home super keen on George and his various contretemps.

You've got to give the book credit for having lasted this long. But it also has the the kinds of problems that come with age -- I was reminded of this having just rewatched the animated Peter Pan ("What makes the red man, red?" etc.) There's an icky imperial subtext and a problematic message about poaching and the scary suggestion that making a mistake will lead to jail time. But what the heck, Paul thinks it's really funny when George falls in the ocean.

...more
1

Aug 22, 2018

What an awful little book - almost as bad as that horrifying story, The Giving Tree. Poor wee George is taken by a poacher, essentially - oh, he's not called a poacher, he's too high-class for that, but it's essentially the same thing. George is destined for the zoo, and on the way he nearly drowns, is put in jail, hangs from balloons at risk of a falling death, and all this is presented as Silly George, What Fun!

Never mind, Georgie. Planet of the Apes is coming and then you'll get yours.
2

May 25, 2008

We are avid Curious George fans at our house. But... this first book of the series was a disappointment when we checked it out from the library.

(If you haven't seen it, check out the Curious George television show on PBS. So cool. The narration, jazz music background and teaching about math/ science is captivating).

This book is a study in cultural change! First, George is captured and removed from his natural habitat in Africa by the man with the yellow hat. George smokes a pipe. George is put We are avid Curious George fans at our house. But... this first book of the series was a disappointment when we checked it out from the library.

(If you haven't seen it, check out the Curious George television show on PBS. So cool. The narration, jazz music background and teaching about math/ science is captivating).

This book is a study in cultural change! First, George is captured and removed from his natural habitat in Africa by the man with the yellow hat. George smokes a pipe. George is put in prison for errantly calling the "fire department" (a reference to 911). George escapes from prison by walking along electric lines after a fat watchman is incapacitated because his weight tips a piece of furniture. George steals balloons from a man selling them. The book ends with George, happy, in the zoo.

There is also throughout the book the usual curious good humor one would expect, and those parts are all in good fun. And, the man with the yellow hat fixes up things a bit, paying off the balloon man, for instance.

But, I think the bad, in this particular book of the series, outweighs the good. Other books in the series have all the charm of Curious George, without the objectionable content, or at least not as much of it! :) ...more
2

Feb 12, 2014

This picture book was a favorite of mine as a child, so I feel disloyal giving it a bad review, but it really does not stand up to the test of time, despite being a children's classic for several generations. I just can't get behind the fact that the man in the big yellow hat literally steals George from the jungles of Africa (in a sack no less!), drags him overseas on a boat, and places the monkey in a zoo, all the while acting like he is doing poor George a favor. Let me say that I am very This picture book was a favorite of mine as a child, so I feel disloyal giving it a bad review, but it really does not stand up to the test of time, despite being a children's classic for several generations. I just can't get behind the fact that the man in the big yellow hat literally steals George from the jungles of Africa (in a sack no less!), drags him overseas on a boat, and places the monkey in a zoo, all the while acting like he is doing poor George a favor. Let me say that I am very pro-zoo; both children and adults learn very important things from visiting zoos. Zoos sen help with breeding programs for endangered species. But nowadays, animals that live in a zoo are bred in the zoo, or purchased from another zoo. Animals from the wild will most likely not be happy in a zoo, and often have great difficulty adjusting. And the reverse is also true - animals living in captivity usually can't adjust to life in the wild. I guess we were not aware of all this back in 1941 when this book was first published.

I've read a biography of Hans and Margarete Rey, who fled from Germany during WWII and transported the early proofs of the Curious George books with them. Whatever issues this book has, the Reys made an important and lasting contribution to children's literature.
...more
3

Apr 02, 2015

This book is the origins of Curious George.

He was 'taken' from Africa (more like captured) by the yellow haired man. As an adult, we all know about animal trafficking and how disturbing it can be, but my student is too young to know about things like that.

The story then goes on to change settings with the boat ride and then arriving at the city. Curious George being Curious proceeds to cause trouble and this time he does indeed get punishment.

He ends up in jail. Yeah. I know. Kind of harsh but This book is the origins of Curious George.

He was 'taken' from Africa (more like captured) by the yellow haired man. As an adult, we all know about animal trafficking and how disturbing it can be, but my student is too young to know about things like that.

The story then goes on to change settings with the boat ride and then arriving at the city. Curious George being Curious proceeds to cause trouble and this time he does indeed get punishment.

He ends up in jail. Yeah. I know. Kind of harsh but not really for fooling the fire department anyone can get in trouble.

George being George get out and gets into more trouble and the next thing you know is he's at the zoo.

This book was good-ish. I like that I finally got to see where the monkey came from but the undertone of animal trafficking left me kind of cringing.

What irks me was that we still got no name for the yellow hatted male. -_- ...more

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